If you plan to build within 3 meters or via a public sewer, a construction agreement is required. Your local water department has a legal right of access to public sewers, so you cannot build these sewers without the consent of the authority. The local water authority must therefore authorize all construction work within 3 metres of a canal or sewer. This is called the Build Over Agreement – what it allows you to build and organize through these sewers, to avoid sewer damage, because the extra weight of the new building could cause sewer collapse and structural damage to the property. According to the 2010 building code, Scheme 1, Part H4, the agreement of a legal undertaker is required for construction work on a public sewer. When “public pollution channels” and “public surface water channels” pass underground, an owner of such land cannot build on or within the distribution line of such a channel without the approval of the regional wastewater operator. This is called “Build over Consent” or “Building over Agreement.” Such an agreement allows the legal undertaker to access the sewers for maintenance purposes. A construction by agreement will also determine the responsibilities of the legal undertaker to repair the damage suffered. If you do not receive the necessary approval before construction, the water department can remove all structures that block access to the sewers and will not be responsible for the damage caused. It can also affect the future sale of your property, since your construction will likely be discovered via a public sewer if your buyer conducts a search during the transaction. Your lawyers will check the drainage report of the sewer plans and location to determine if part of your land appears to be 3 metres from a canal or runoff.

If the winter garden was built before July 1, 2011, it requires an explicit building permit or permit, and may have required a building permit. All sewer companies have legal rights for access to public sewers located on private land. These include sewers located under or near a property. Once building permits have been issued, sewerage companies will generally attempt to seize the sewers without disrupting the land. If this is unavoidable, they will repair all the damage done in reason. This will be defined in the terms of the implementation of agreements. However, if sewers have been built without authorization, sewerage companies have the right to access and protect by any means they deem appropriate. This may include the requirement that buildings that obstruct or block access to a public channel be modified or removed at the homeowner`s expense. In reality, companies have machines that generally allow them to access a damaged pipe from another point unimpeded and avoid damage wherever possible, but a risk remains.